Why You Should be Vegan

Five reasons why you should be vegan.

“Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.”–Dr. Seuss

  1. For the cows in dairy hell, cattle ranches and farms; for the pigs stuffed into gestation crates and pens; for the hens jammed into battery cages and those packed together in “free-range” style; for the creatures burned, cut, poisoned, and experimented on; for those fearfully huddled together in fur farms, zoos, and pet stores; for the fish, turtles, and frogs hooked, gigged, speared, and netted; for the lobsters and crawfish boiled alive; for all the animals betrayed, snared, trapped, tricked, and shot; for those beaten physically and psychologically into submission for entertainment; for those chained, hungry, and thirsty with nowhere to go for relief; for those who’ve lost the will to live, suffering without hope.

  2. It is an ongoing act of civil disobedience. A damn fucking good one. A compelling demonstration of contempt against the corporate-capitalist forces aligned against us earthlings.

  3. It is potent medicine for an ailing planet.

  4. No greater comprehensive testimony of caring is possible.

  5. It’s a damn healthy diet.

5a. It’s the right thing to do.

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Author: Peter Schreiner

Ethical Vegan, Idealistic Anarchist and Practicing Nonconformist, Amateur Writer, Prolific Dreamer, Hardcore Misanthrope

34 thoughts on “Why You Should be Vegan”

        1. Their things are yummy, that’s for sure. 🙂 We have an inexpensive restaurant around here called NOODLES. You can get anything and substitute tofu for the meat (you can do that in a lot of places but this is quick and it doesn’t cost much for lunch). It’s great food but I don’t know if they are everywhere. It might depend on where you live. When I reblogged your post I wanted to write something but there’s a new format and I couldn’t figure out where to do it, so sorry about that.

          Liked by 1 person

  1. Yes!! Yes!! All truths most people either don’t want to hear or won’t. I am constantly fighting the vegan corner, against people who don’t really want to think about it or are patronising or just don’t give a shit. I am also sick of how many times I have to explain it isn’t a diet. It is a choice about life and being in the world and being aware what our actions and choices mean and wanting a better world, even though that seems very far away in this world of escalating violence and chaos, made so by design, and to live by your own inner guidance and self reliance, rather than be guided and ruled by other people’s bullshit….But there I go, being ‘extreme’ again!!

    Liked by 3 people

  2. I really like the cartoon! I wish I had the skill to draw my ideas to pull them out of esoteria. As far as being a vegan, to avoid our industrial food system it makes total sense. However, we do need large ruminant animals existing on the land (we need to give them life, even if we are opposed to planning their death). After careful thought and research Allan Savory and Greg Judy, combined with my own intellect, have won me over to the need of more animals to reverse so many of the environmental problems we are facing. The plants of bacterial dominated soils (grasslands, as opposed to forests) are facing desertification/erosion because they depend on these massive herds interacting with them. The plants and animals coevolved today, and our modern infrastructure (roads and protected/fenced private property) denies these interactions from taking place, so the animals missing is what is leading to the dwindling of plant life, thus adding to eroding soils. Awful metallic machinery is doing a fair share, too, but it is a plurality of punishments and neglects to the land that explains why it is doing so poorly (and thus why we are doing so poorly).

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    1. Sadly, the argument is academic. Although your solutions are reasonable, due other considerations beyond the scope of this reply.

      However, I take strong exception to any planning of death. The mere suggestion is fascist in nature, bears the weight of speciesism, and rather than breaking the chain of injustice it continues and encourages tyranny over the vulnerable. And that’s not what we should be teaching our children.

      There is no peace for any until there is peace for all. After all, we are all earthlings.

      Thank you for your comment, Karlos, it’s good food for thought.

      Peace.

      Like

      1. I agree fully that the planning of death is fascist, along with the scientific “control” method, which I think you’d agree though I’m not familiar enough with your worldview. Predation is another matter, and perhaps we should be frugivores and not herd-tracking hunters, there is a frugivorian anarchist who I very much appreciate his work. I lack the enzymes/genetics to derive protein and fats wholly from plant sources (although maybe if I had coconut/sugarpalm fruit access?), and because I believe in plant consciousness I wonder why they would put so many defense mechanisms (e.g. lectins) if they were okay with being eaten. As for a fruit-only lifestyle, I do have an upcoming post regarding the need for humans to return to the tropics where our biology belongs imo, where we don’t need bundles of artificialities and resource sucking out of the biosphere just to keep ourselves alive. Climate can breed fascism, if you want to think about deep origins of the problem and “need” for control. As far as Savory and Judy, I wouldn’t dismiss their arguments as academic per se if you are referring to the coevolution part. I think the concept of coevolution can be reached intuitively and anecdotally. That there would have been (and is still a window for) symbiosis between plants and animals is something that I think existed long before academia. We academically know why that is now (or we think we do), but it existed for a long time before, when we were human “doers” in the environment and not human “knowers”. Thanks for the discussion, I will end myself here. Cheers and peace!

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Karlos, you’ve said a lot in only a few words and I’m slow in comprehension, so I’ll have to mull over this for a while. And too I’ll invest study into this “coevolution…symbiosis between plants and animals.” It’s intriguing.

          Again, thank you.

          Like

          1. An interesting recent book on this topic is A Critique of the Moral Defence of Vegetarianism by Andrew F. Smith. It’s not perfect, but it introduces some thought-provoking ideas. I think that creating a world respectful of the moral standing of plants is the ideal, veganism is the necessarily utilitarian first step. We’ll harm far fewer plants if we are not feeding them to livestock animals. And I do think we need to address the needs of sentient animals first. Many plants actually evolved to be eaten: their reproductive cycles require that seeds are carried and passed through a digestive tract, for instance. That can’t be said of animals, as far as I know.

            Liked by 2 people

  3. “It is an ongoing act of civil disobedience. A damn fucking good one.”

    Yes. I remind myself of this when I feel fatigued or isolated. It’s because acts of disobedience are uncomfortable. Uncomfortable is necessary.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. This is another I shall print out and keep to hand Peter, you have the words that fail me.

    These days in the UK every local supermarket sells vegan meat/dairy substitutes for the following – ice cream (including Cornettos and Choc-ices on a stick), sausages, burgers (both fake meat (beef and chicken)and vegetable based), chicken and beef style pies, nuggets, schnitzels, a variety of cheeses, yoghurts and desserts, cream, and more I can’t remember because I have an ailing brain. For butties there’s tons of ‘slice’ available in Holland and Barratts – once again meat substitutes – chicken, turkey, beef. Oh and sausage rolls and stir fry strips of fake chicken and beef too. I centre here on the substitutes because I believe that’s the way to encourage the meat eaters who say they’d like to stop eating animal products, but love the taste too much. Every week there seems to be a new product available, and they taste great. When I think back to the watery soya milk I drank eighteen years ago (and sometimes made myself), and consider the options available then, I’m amazed at the choice now. Cooking good vegetables and making my own sauces is a preference, but I’ll happily give in to my nostalgic tastes knowing no harm comes to any sentient being as I do so. Kindness. It’s spreading Peter.

    esme smiling and waving upon the Cloud.

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